My Body is Contained Within the Limitlessness of My Soul | Jim Carrey Commencement Address

Every once in a while I post the exact same blog simultaneously on each of my sites. This is one of those times. It occurs when I come across something that I feel is so profound and important, that it must be shared.

It is this! Jim Carrey’s Commencement Address to the 2014 graduating class of Maharishi University (MUM).

Jim Carey’s Secret of Life The Journey of Purpose

Jim Carey’s Secret of Life The Journey of Purpose

I’m obviously big on the subject matter of Jim Carrey’s speeches, as I’d posted a blog referencing one this past summer. https://carolkeiter.wordpress.com/2014/08/22/love-over-fear-jim-carrey-supermoon-hitchabout-lakota-sioux-secret-within/ Same-same, but different. I also recently wrote about a similar subject; matters of heart and choosing love over fear. https://digesthis.wordpress.com/2015/01/07/addendum-to-journey-in-space-time-ignited-by-matters-of-heart-epigenetics-heartmath/

Jim Carrey announces that he’s found his ministry in the Church of Freedom from Concern (FFC)

You can spend your whole life worrying about ghosts and about the path to the future.

So many of us choose our path out of fear, disguised as practicality. He mentions that his father could have been a great comedian, but he didn’t believe that it was possible for him. Instead, he took the conservative path and chose a safe job as an accountant. And ironically was sooner than later ‘let go’ by the firm. Point of the story:

You can fail at what you don’t want, so you might as well take a chance in doing what you love.

Carrey says I’m here to plant a seed, to help you move forward in life.

Will that seed be allowed to take root? Or will you be forced by Monsanto to use their seed? which causes knowing laughter to ripple through the audience.

Life doesn’t happen to you, it happens for you. Ask the universe for it!

sunset

sunset


He goes on to say, I used to believe that who I was, ended at the edge of my skin. Then I learned that everything outside the vehicle is part of me too! We have no limits…you can’t contain the container.

How can you serve the world?

Look at what the world needs, that your talent can provide.

The effect you have on others is the most valuable currency there is.

Finding true peace lies beyond personality, beyond the perception of others, invention and disguise, beyond effort itself.

• To find real peace, you have to let the armor go.

• Your need for acceptance can make you invisible in this world.

• Don’t let anything stand in the way of the light that shines through this form!

• Risk being seen in all of your glory.

• The imagination is always manufacturing scenarios, both good and bad. The ego tries to keep you trapped in the multiplex of the mind.

• Our eyes are not merely viewers, they are also projectors, running a second story over the picture.

• Fear is writing the script; the working title “I’ll never be enough.”

• How tricky this ego is, with the promise of something, that we already possess!

• Let the universe know what you want, and work toward it, while letting go of how it comes about.

• Your job is not to figure out how it’s going to happen, but to open the door in your head. Then when the door appears in your life, just walk through it.

• Don’t worry if you miss your cue, there are always doors opening.

Take a chance on faith. Not religion, but faith. Not hope, but faith.
He says I don’t believe in hope. Hope is a beggar.

Hope walks through the fire and faith leaps over it.

Carol among crowd in New York city attending a Make Music New York event at Times Square presented by Yoko Ono

Carol among crowd in New York city attending a Make Music New York event at Times Square presented by Yoko Ono

Carol Keiter, blogger, Make Music New York,Times Square, Yoko Ono

Carol Keiter the blogger in New York city attending a Make Music New York event at Times Square presented by Yoko Ono

Seven Cultural Concepts we don’t have in the U.S. | Live Each Moment More Fully

Seven Cultural Concepts we don't have in the U.S.

Seven Cultural Concepts we don’t have in the U.S.

The author of this article: 7 Cultural Concepts we don’t have in the U.S. in Mother Nature Network says at the end, “I’d like to integrate some of these ideas into my own life. Over the last few years I have dropped Christmas and Easter (I’ve been an atheist for over 25 years now) and replaced them with a Solstice celebrations; I have remade New Year’s into a quiet, reflective time (the antithesis of a party); and have incorporated an appreciation and gratefulness aspect into my almost-daily meditation routine. I’ve kept Thanksgiving, though mine is vegetarian, so the focus is on the harvest and thanks and not killing a turkey. And I celebrate Halloween some years, when I feel into it, and not if I don’t. And forget Valentine’s Day! ”

Liberté? Censorship in the West | Teju Cole The New Yorker | Kabir Chibber Quartz

I came across these two articles amidst the hubbub of the media’s portrayal of events in Paris after the attack on Charlie Hebdo and feel they need to be shared. Each point out the bigger picture, censorship and colonialism in the West.

One written by Teju Cole for the New Yorker January 9th, Unmournable Bodies

Charlie Hebdo, the New Yorker, Teju Cole, the Eiffel Tower

“Unmournable Bodies” article by Teju Cole for the New Yorker, the Eiffel Tower dark after attack on Charlie Hebdo

“This week’s events took place against the backdrop of France’s ugly colonial history, its sizable Muslim population, and the suppression, in the name of secularism, of some Islamic cultural expressions, such as the hijab.

Rather than posit that the Paris attacks are the moment of crisis in free speech—as so many commentators have done—it is necessary to understand that free speech and other expressions of liberté are already in crisis in Western societies; the crisis was not precipitated by three deranged gunmen. The U.S., for example, has consolidated its traditional monopoly on extreme violence, and, in the era of big data, has also hoarded information about its deployment of that violence. There are harsh consequences for those who interrogate this monopoly. The only person in prison for the C.I.A.’s abominable torture regime is John Kiriakou, the whistle-blower. Edward Snowden is a hunted man for divulging information about mass surveillance. Chelsea Manning is serving a thirty-five-year sentence for her role in WikiLeaks. They, too, are blasphemers, but they have not been universally valorized, as have the cartoonists of Charlie Hebdo.”

The other submitted by the author Kabir Chibber, a number of hours ago on January 11th, for Quartz Boko Haram is turning into the next Islamic State

World Leaders, Hypocrites, Charlie Hebdo, liberté

World Leaders in Paris Today 2015-01-11 Quartz Biggest Hypocrites re: Free Speech

Kabir Chibber states “These are the biggest hypocrites celebrating free speech today in Paris.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The schoolgirls were kidnapped 8 months ago and are still missing.

Boka Haram #BringBackOurGirls Quartz

Boka Haram #BringBackOurGirls Quartz

This week, Boko Haram used a 10 year old girl as a suicide bomber. Last week, Boko Haram committed its worst atrocity yet, killing as many as 2,000 people in Baga (Nigeria). Most of the victims were reportedly children, women and elderly people who “could not run fast enough when insurgents drove into Baga, firing rocket-propelled grenades and assault rifles on town residents,” The Guardian reported. Civilians gave up on trying to count all the bodies.

Kabir mentions that the recent massacre barely made a ripple in the international media. Not enough people are paying attention!

I caught this the other evening and thought it interesting. An interview with Nawaz Gerges, Middle East expert talks about the clash of ideologies on ‘Consider This‘ – an Al Jazeera America news show. He mentions that France’s secular ideology (i.e. dis approval of Muslim traditions such as women wearing the hijab (headscarf and veil in schools) causing some young people (mostly men) to feel disenchanted and disenfranchised in their place in the country. This can wind up motivating them to become recruits into the extremist groups. At the same time, he mentions that the extremists are trying to divide Western society. They recruit the disaffected militants (like the Paris gunmen who are like pawns) to carry out their missions like ‘hit men’ for the larger cause. As I listened to this interview I recalled George Bush Jr.’s (the President at the time) reaction and statements to the public on the day of the 2001 synchronized terrorist attacks in the United States, and thought, he was sort of guilty of the same thing. By talking about an ‘Axis of Evil’ and pointing to the Muslim world he was driving a wedge into international relations. Even if he had specified a smaller segment of militant extremists, somehow the ‘stamp’ of Muslim stuck as ‘someone to be feared’. Am I wrong or missing something?

A letter to my sister | preciousness of life | Carl Sagan: freedom through scientific skepticism

I was looking over my blog stats and saw someone read this, a very early blog. I decided to post it, since it’s relevant, from a moral and political standpoint – uh, yes, at one time I believe, the two were part of the same fabric. uh, now wait a minute, maybe morality and political leadership, have rarely been paired, and that it is an exception! I mean, as long as royal leaders, and tyrants, and corporations have the reins, morality has not a fucking thing to do with the people who wish to maintain their power, control and profits.

I am certainly happy to hear from you. Naturally I think about you every time that I enter the room to look at the lovely paper lanterns you hung for Mother’s birthday party and the teepee you constructed in the yard – which I‘m still raking! Memories of things people share and artifacts that they leave behind imbue all of these things with the spirit of the person. I am sorry that we had difficulties communicating at times. I have not been ‘above’ reacting emotionally to someone’s emotional reactions towards me. However, that doesn’t mean that I can not attempt to move beyond my reactions to reach out with more compassion and understanding.

Antoine de Saint-Exupery, author, Le Petit Prince, The Little Prince

Antoine de Saint-Exupery author Le Petit Prince
The Little Prince

I went out with a family friend last night and afterwards, realized that he knows even more profoundly how precious life is, as he has lost both of his parents. Certainly, if we all had an acute awareness of death (sitting on our shoulders) – Carlos Castaneda style i.e. “the Teachings of Don Juan” – in each response to every moment, we would never be anything but kind to all people and creatures, at all times.

That sounds like a pretty heavy way to live. The context is not, to be continually fearful, but rather, continually present with the fact that every moment of life is precious. People need to accept the rights of others to be and perceive as they will. It is a rather large task, to put differences and competitiveness, jealousy, envy and judgments … aside. Yet it’s the only way for everyone to get along. (I just read in Salon dot com a rather scathing article about the writer Carlos Castaneda, saying that Don Juan was not only an astounding hoax, but that Castaneda went on to form a bizarre cult.) He nevertheless had strong poetic and spiritual points to emphasize in his writings.

It’s pretty much a life-long task, given the fact that all humans have a tendency to subjectively interpret and judge other peoples’ actions. I do it, we all do it, from personal complaints, grievances, expectations, disappointments on up to community and cultural, political and religious differences of interpretation, that result in the worst cases to prolonged wars and strife between ethnic groups and neighboring countries.

This appears to be one of the biggest challenges and aspirations for humankind; to look beyond differences and strive for understanding, compassion and kindness. The ‘tree-hugger/environmental activist side of me’ is kicking out judgements every time I see people’s actions or material opulence (not to mention hearing about plans for more gas drilling in the arctic etc.) which I perceive as offensive. I put them into a box I label offender/perpetrator; a personal judgement which is my own way of playing in the ‘us against them’ scenario. So, I’m as guilty as anyone. The obvious extreme is the fact that people are blowing each other up in the Middle East …. and that wars and conflicts and ominous actions of manipulation continue to proliferate worldwide, despite the fact that most humans have access to rather extraordinary tools.

We are technologically light years ahead of where we are emotionally!

As Carl Sagan mentions in this interview “A Way of Thinking” in which he delivers insights into the dangers in our present culture; based on the fact that we’re a science and technology-based culture, the inner workings of which few comprehend. That puts us in a position in which we are in danger of being more easily manipulated.

Sagan points out that science is a way of skeptically interrogating the universe. And that it’s dramatically important for each of us to ask skeptical questions about everything, particularly to those in authority; otherwise we are up for grabs by the next charlatan, political or religious, that comes along. He mentions that Thomas Jefferson said that people need to be educated in order to practice their skepticism, otherwise ‘we don’t run the government, the government runs us’.