Faber Castell Watercolor Pencils Painting | European Beech Tree | Swan Point Cemetery

Here’s a new Faber Castell watercolor pencil painting I did of this lovely
European Beech Tree at Swan Point Cemetery in Providence, Rhode Island

Flickr European Beech Tree, Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, Rhode Island

Flickr European Beech Tree

Faber Castell watercolor pencil, painting, European Beech Tree

Faber Castell watercolor pencil painting European Beech Tree

Carol Keiter aka nomadbeatz welcomes donations for her writing, photography, illustrations, eBook & music composition

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Carol sitting under the trees

Carol sitting under the trees

About carolkeiter
Aspiring writer, artist, musician and composer who was born and raised in the United States and has resided in several European countries. Communication is my forte; both through using various tools and in approaching people of divers backgrounds to gather information. Speak conversational - advanced intermediate - French, German and Spanish. Love interacting with people in cultural centers as much as going to remote places to learn more about the different creatures that share our planet. Love of the outdoors and of a variety of outdoor sports. Driven to learn and expand my own consciousness and understanding through curiosity and love of life. Creative skills merge with analytical ones, leading to an interest in a myriad of topics; ranging from politics, economics, science to environmental. Motivated to use my art, music and writing to support and educate people towards humane practices that support and respect all of life, including practices supporting a healthy planet.

One Response to Faber Castell Watercolor Pencils Painting | European Beech Tree | Swan Point Cemetery

  1. Loren Booda says:

    Your final product again echoes van Gogh’s post-impressionism. Your watercolors often shift my attention between realism and the “Magic Eye” effect. The tree has personality; I can practically see faces in it, overlooking the cemetery. Those reddish leaves have gathered again. You prefer to reflect on life rather than graves, I guess.

    It’s nice to see that spring is still alive. I have gathered beechnuts for a healthful, safe snack — but among the dead? That reminds me of tales where a plant would grow out of a corpse, but here that is too morbid.

    Nevertheless, an old graveyard is often a study in solemn beauty, with ancient trees, flowering bushes and sometimes interesting tombstones. In D.C., Dumbarton Oaks Park and garden rest adjacent to such a space, a graveyard so steep it requires hand digging. Arlington National Cemetery, known for its expanses of white gravestones, has an older section where architects exercised artistic licence in designing tombs — geometric, familial, historic and/or spiritual.

    Beech trees hang on to some of their leaves all winter long. Coincidentally, I spread some of my parent’s ashes near a beach grove, overlooking a creek in a park at which I used to work. I hope your creative legacy is protected for the ages, Carol — even some by me.

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