“I Am” documentary | What is Wrong with the World? What can we do about it?

After facing his own death, film producer Tom Shadyac suddenly had an instant sense of clarity and purpose. He went around the world with a film crew of four, to talk with significant minds, authors, journalists, academics, leaders, historians, religious leaders who had been extremely influential and inspirational in his own life, to ask two questions: What is Wrong with the World? What can we do about it?

He created this documentary film in three parts. This is it. Tom Shadyac director of I Am. Part one.

Asking whether there is a fundamental, endemic problem, that causes all the other problems?

I Am, director Tom Shadyac, Albert Einstein quote

I Am, Albert Einstein quote

I Am Part Two introduces HeartMath, the concept that the heart is smart and in many indigenous cultures, the heart is the center of consciousness, not the brain. It also ventures into quantum entanglement.

I Am, Desmond Tutu

Desmond Tutu God says I dont have anybody else except you

I Am Howard Zinn No evidence that war comes out of some innate human need

“I Am” Part Three introduces the fact that mass mind – many individual actions together – really does affect the fabric of reality. The evolutionary biologist, Elisabet Sahtouris, states
this is a participatory universe. Interconnectivity. Everything that we do in it, changes it. We have an interior role in co-creating with all the other species.

Everything on our planet is alive.
 

I Am Part Three Howard Zinn talks about how change happens in increments by individual actions together. Desmond Tutu states that change happens, when each person feels concern.

I Am quote Ralph Waldo Emerson, Money, False Principles

I Am quote Ralph Waldo Emerson

The Power of One person.

I Am video on Vimeo Dr David Suzuki

I Am, We should be grateful and celebrate our relatives

I Am We should be grateful and celebrate our relatives

Dr. David Suzuki, scientist, author “The Sacred Balance”, mentions Wade Davis’s term the ethnosphere: the sum total of all of the ways that humans beings have imagines the world into existence. Suzuki talks about the separation of humanity from the natural world, and the fact that the economy is the most important thing in our lives.

Among the people interviewed:

Lynne McTaggart – Author, “the Field” talks of the stories that fashion our worldview, in a competition, scarcity, in which a person needs to be significant, at someone else’s expense

Dean Radin – Senior Scientist, Institute of Noetic Sciences,

Howard Zinn – Historian, Author “A People’s History of the United States”

John Francis – Environmentalist, Author “Planetwalker”

Noam Chomsky- Professor Emeritus of Linguistics, MIT

Desmond Tutu – Archbishop, Cape Town, South Africa

Thom Hartmann – Author “Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight”
There’s a fundamental difference between machines and life, and we are running our society as if we are a machine and as if the world is a machine
Thom mentions Jack Davis Professor of Native American studies at UCA Davis, talks of the Native American term “Wetico” = cannibal – one who eats the life of another. It is considered an illness.

Daniel Quinn – Author, “Ishmael”

Ray Anderson – CEO Interface

Chris Jordan – Photographer

Coleman Barks – Poet, Author “The Essential Rumi”

Marc Ian Barasch – Author, “Field Notes on the Compassionate Life”

Dacher Keltner – Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley

Rollin McCraty – Senior Researcher, Heartmath Institute

Elisabet Sahtouris – Evolutionary Biologist

Marilyn Schlitz – President, CEO Institute of Noetic Sciences

 

eco_revolution

Carol holding the plastic globe

Face to Face 1959 with the prescient Carl G. Jung – If I Know a thing, I don’t have to Believe

As I continue (now in the last running stretch ’til Spring) writing my book, I came across this pretty remarkable 1959 Face to Face interview of Carl Gustav Jung. It looks like it would be pretty dry, yet this man is so sharp and prescient. He answers thoughtfully and precisely, with surprises bubbling up.

face to face, Carl Gustav Jung, 1959 interview, student of Sigmund Freud

He explored the inner world of the psyche all of his life. Here’s a great review of his concepts, The Jungian Model of the Psyche.

In this 1959 interview he said several unequivocally against-the-mainstream statements that caught my attention.

Basically, that evil does not exist ‘outside’ of man. it originates from us. For this reason the psyche of human nature should be studied voraciously, because we are the biggest danger to ourselves.

He mentioned, 1959 I remind you, that people are full of apprehension – not merely their dreams – but that their dreams reflect their conscious lives. He was Swiss, yet global. So in the middle of the last century fear was already formulating, certainly a lot of fears congruent with societal pressures … fear of the unknown, fear of change, xenophobia, fear of not having control.

When asked if death is as important as birth. Jung answered, “if” death is an end, we are not quite certain.

Explaining, we have peculiar faculties of the psyche, in which it is not confined to space and time. People can have dreams and visions of the future, see around corners. Only ignorance denies these facts, these have existed always.

Therefore, if the psyche is (in part at least) not dependent upon these confinements, not under the obligation to live in time and space alone, and obviously it doesn’t, then it is not subject to these laws. Why would the psyche need to conform to the same laws as the physical one’s of space and time?

When asked about whether he ‘believes’ in something, the question was regarding death.

Jung answered

Belief is difficult for me. Either I know a thing, and if i know it, I don’t need to believe it.

I don’t allow myself to believe a thing, just for the sake of believing it.
I can’t believe it, but if there are sufficient reasons for a hypothesis, then I will accept it.

Regarding the later years in life, if you look forward, you can live like there are centuries ahead of you, looking forward to the great adventure that is ahead each day, then one lives.

However, if someone is fearful and only looking back at the past and has already checked out from being interested and engaged in life, then they will probably not do very well.

If you think in a certain way, you may feel considerably better. hehehe

if you think along the lines of nature, you are definitely thinking better.

Man doesn’t stand for his nullification. All people seek their own existence. Man cannot stand a meaningless life.

I was super pleasantly surprised to hear his words that contradict, uh, much of what mainstream human cultures still have trouble accepting.

Climate Change for Skeptics or Believers | Sam Harris Interviews Climate Expert Joseph Romm

 

Two hours of attentive listening. Make the Time. It is so well worth it!

This two hour podcast is extremely informative. Sam Harris directs the questions in a very intelligible manner. His guest, Joseph Romm, an author, blogger, physicist and climate expert, is fantastically eloquent and articulate. Each word he uses, each sentence is jam-packed with information; displaying his knowledge about the subject of science, human behavior, economics and the politics of power and persuasion.

Sam Harris podcast, audio interview with Climate Expert, Joseph Romm

Sam Harris podcast audio interview with Climate Expert Joseph Romm

Sam Harris podcast, audio interview with Climate Expert, Joseph Romm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is especially for people who don’t believe that Climate Change is caused through the actions of human beings. Yet is even more persuasive and full of facts for those of you who are already convinced that man’s actions are inextricably linked to Climate Destruction. His guest who wrote the book “What you Need to Know about Climate Change”

LISTEN to inform yourself, regardless of what your opinion is.

 

Carol Keiter aka nomadbeatz, blogger, currently completing by first eBook, musician and composer, has no income, zero. I spend time communicating these things, reading, researching, writing, conversing, because I am passionately interested in the subjects of in particular, saving the environment and habitats of animals from human greed and destruction. I have the time to ponder and consider these things, because my world is not centralized around an immediate family; I am single, and ready to engage in any task employing my language and communication skills, anywhere presently.

PayPal Donate Button

carol keiter squinting in the Montpellier, France sun

carol keiter blogger card

carol keiter blogger card

the identity behind the mask | which differentiates my group from your group |

A Polish neurologist acquaintance of mine sent me this article, continuing with the theme of our previous discussion. It’s all about the personas that each of us human beings pull around ourselves like a veil. The word person, is derived from the Latin word referencing the masks that Greek actors wore on stage, to be seen from people far away. I touched on the subject of masks in an earlier blog, referring to these gangs in Los Angeles who use masquerade together with dance, as a stand-off against other gangs.
http://digesthis.wordpress.com/2011/10/12/the-role-of-the-clown-humor-in-imparting-information

The blog “You Are Not So Smart: A Celebration of Self Delusion, prominently states in the introduction to the concept.

The Misconception: You are a rational, logical being who sees the world as it really is; who celebrates diversity and respects others points of view.

The Truth: You are driven to create and form groups and then believe that others are wrong, just because they are others. ! you are as deluded as the rest of us !

“You Are Not So Smart” is a blog devoted to self delusion and irrational thinking. “There is a growing body of research suggesting you have no idea why you act or think the way you do. The origins of your emotional states, your motivations, your behaviors and beliefs are largely inaccessible to your conscious mind.”

The particular article my friend sent, entitled the illusion of asymmetric insight, talks about the various masks that we use and identify ourselves with, both individually and in groups. What is asymmetric, is the lopsided way that we tend to believe that we understand what lies behind another person or group’s mask, yet feel that the other could not begin to comprehend the degree of complexity that lies beyond our own.

“The idea is this: You put on a mask and uniform before leaving for work. You put on another set for school. You have costume for friends of different persuasions and one just for family. Who you are alone is not who you are with a lover or a friend….and if you don’t step back occasionally and feel a bit bizarre how you are wearing a socially constructed mask and uniform, you are probably a psychopath.”

“You know, as a citizen of the Internet, you obfuscate the truth of your character. You hide your fears and transgressions and vulnerable yearnings for meaning, for purpose, for connection. “… So, you don social masks just like every human going back to the first campfires….You seem rather confident in them, in their ability to communicate and conceal that which you want on display and that which you wish was not. Groups too don these masks. Political parties establish platforms, companies give employees handbooks, countries write out constitutions, tree houses post club rules. Every human gathering and institution from the Gay Pride Parade to the KKK works to remain connected by developing a set a norms and values which signals to members when they are dealing with members of the in-group and help identify others as part of the out-group. The peculiar thing though is that once you feel this, once you feel included in a human institution or ideology, you can’t help but see outsiders through a warped lens called the illusion of asymmetric insight.”

In a series of experiments and questionnaires put out by a cross study or researchers at Stanford together with the University of Illinois, the data gathered revealed that “Most people rated their insight into their best friend as keen, yet in the other direction, felt that the insight that their friend’s possessed of them was lacking”….and when it came to groups, “Both groups thought they knew more about their opponents than their opponents knew about themselves.”

“The illusion of asymmetric insight makes it seem as though you know everyone else far better than they know you, and not only that, but you know them better than they know themselves.”

“The researchers explained this is how one eventually arrives at the illusion of naive realism, or believing your thoughts and perceptions are true, accurate and correct, therefore if someone sees things differently than you or disagrees with you in some way it is the result of a bias or an influence or a shortcoming. You feel like the other person must have been tainted in some way, otherwise they would see the world the way you do – the right way.”

“All primates depend on groups to survive and thrive, and human groups thrive most of all. It is in your nature to form them….humans have an innate drive to develop and observe norms and rituals (which) will express itself even in a cultural vacuum, but there is a dark side to this behavior. As psychologist Jonathan Haidt says, our minds “unite us into teams, divide us against other teams, and blind us to the truth.”

“When you feel the warm comfort of belonging to a team, a tribe, a group – to a party, an ideology, a religion or a nation – you instinctively turn others into members of outgroups, into outsiders.”

If this peaks your interest, read the entire article for yourself! I just wanted to skip to the poignant parts and paraphrase it, for those who don’t have the time or inclination.

Today, scanning the headlines, I found an article which magnetically pulled my attention to it. Once I listened to but the first featured video of an interview with this professor of philosophy, it resonated with me. I write about it in my other blog.

http://digesthis.wordpress.com/2011/11/03/a-c-grayling-the-freedom-of-creating-ones-own-meaning-is-a-terrifying-responsibility

The philosopher, A.C. Grayling talks about the fact that the meaning which lies behind things/events, effectively comes from whatever we personally designate – as that which has this or that value. And that our universe, the world that we each create around ourself, is all there is. There is no God, no other deities, just us, that render its meaning. A concept which in itself, is quite a frightening responsibility.