Nightingale Song and Coyote encounter on Midnight Prowl in Sonoran Desert

Last night, i was on my way bicycling – taking a different route home as always – to discover in the darkness (also daylight) all of these different lovely residences with cool plants and/or lighting at night here in Tucson, Arizona. I’m presently charging the batteries of my camera to go out on a night trek to capture the fact that all over in this town, strangely, there are ‘christmas’ lights that remain, uh, year round, as it is approaching the end of June and they’re all still there.

nightingale pics

nightingale pics


I stopped to listen for quite a while to the song of a nightingale, then left, heard my phone beep, stopped to look at it and it occurs to me to go back to capture the sound via video. I went back to the bird. (I have since downloaded an app for audio recording) I stood there motionless with my one arm up in the air like the statue of liberty, my phone next to the tree, when I saw activity down the block. Too big to be a cat, a family dog no. As a figure in the darkness silhouetted against a wall approached, I realized it was a coyote. To my delight, there were at least four of them. One of them started trotting directly towards me from across the street, which caused me to turn around, which startled them. It darted away and several emitted some low barks. I turned the light of my phone on as I was still in video recording mode. Though I wasn’t successful in capturing them, as i shown my light towards them I saw several motionless pairs of illuminated eyes looking back at me as they stood still for a moment in curiosity, trying to figure out what i was all about. The nightingale was still singing away, a plethora of tunes, in such a dramatic range of sounds and octaves…what a wild few minutes of this evening.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhCRzwxVnv0&feature=youtu.be

I’ve just found out that the best means to get an mp4 out there to the world, is not by attempting to upload it to Facebook or WordPress, but to my (your) youtube channel, and then providing the link. voila. Here’s the link to the video, during which time at 2:45 into the tape, while capturing the nightingale’s melodies, you here the barks of the coyotes.

This is a dark video, for the purpose only of capturing a tiny fraction of the immense diversity of song of the nightingale.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_nightingale

“The common nightingale or simply nightingale (Luscinia megarhynchos), also known as rufous nightingale, is a small passerine bird best known for its powerful and beautiful song.”

coyotes difference between dog, wolf, coyote, jackal and fox

coyotes difference between dog, wolf, coyote, jackal and fox

Coyotes are slick, coming into the town during the night. It was about midnight. How cool! I then got on my bicycle to follow them, found one lagging behind that darted into bushes. Tucson is mostly flat, one story houses. I’ve seen baby quails, lots of lizards, have seen a coyote during the daytime by a dry river bed, but not yet any javelinas (wild pigs). I love nature!

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/coyote/

“The coyote appears often in the tales and traditions of Native Americans—usually as a very savvy and clever beast. Modern coyotes have displayed their cleverness by adapting to the changing American landscape. These members of the dog family once lived primarily in open prairies and deserts, but now roam the continent’s forests and mountains. They have even colonized cities like Los Angeles, and are now found over most of North America. Coyote populations are likely at an all-time high.”

Tucson, Arizona is located in a small fraction of the immense area that encompasses the Sonoran desert.
https://www.desertmuseum.org/desert/sonora.php
Sonoran desert region presented by the Sonoran Desert museum.

Sonoran desert region, subdivision , sonoran desert museum

Sonoran desert region and its subdivision -sonoran desert museum

I have since downloaded an audio app, to record the unfathomable richness and amusing song of nightingales. 🙂 delightful encounter!

Don’t know why it sounds like i’m standing next to a fast moving river – – ha aha – – here in the desert. poor audio. i’m working on it.

Carol Keiter, blogger, musician, composer

Carol Keiter the blogger, musician and composer

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Carol Keiter aka nomadbeatz welcomes donations to her writing, photography, illustrations, eBook & music composition

Intention Without a Plan, Evolves a Path of Action

I’m going to do something unprecedented, write with extreme brevity.

mountains ring the valley

 

pink adobe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Couldn’t resist a shot of the classic pink adobe.

Not one, but at least two resident iguanas.

Not one, but at least two resident iguanas.

 

 

 

 

Though this adobe isn’t my new home, these are some of my new apt flatmates.

 

 

 

 

There really couldn’t have been more of a circuitous way of arriving in this community. My head said simply, head south, plan B was to head to northern France to help with the refugees along the coastline facing Great Britain.

a hazardous bridge is far better than a wall :-)

a hazardous bridge is far better than a wall 🙂

I’ve since learned that French speaking skills will come in handy here because among a large number of refugees from all over the world coming to Tucson because of its low cost of living, there is a significant African population.

I’ve contacted several refugee resettlement groups here in Tucson, the IRC and the Lutheran Social Services of the Southwest-Refugee Focus program to volunteer in various capacities such as being assigned to a family to maintain continuity and build trust. I will also volunteer at the

The Tucson Wildlife center is a Sanctuary just east of the city, which also borders the Saguaro National Forest

The Tucson Wildlife center is a Sanctuary just east of the city, which also borders the Saguaro National Forest

Tucson Wildlife center. In the meantime looking for ways of employing my skills in a variety of different ways.

I’ve discovered that there’s a substantial number of writers, artists and musicians living in this town. I had to bypass an ultimate frisbee hat tournament (on a sort of stormy day) to attend the Spring Arts Open House festival Heart of Tucson Art. There I met with a number of artists in the intimacy of their own homes, checking out their art and chatting. Among my bicycle mode of transportation to go from here to there, I’ve amassed some photos. cactus man

My path to arrive here may appear completely haphazard, as I had mentally crossed off all communities not lying on the coasts, and yet I’m finding many of the things that a city can offer, as well as complete wilderness in a matter of an hour bike ride; yes, pleasantly surprised.

Now I have a bicycle, not the one pictured here which I used to move from Plan B, in which less is indeed more.

Small back pack and messenger bag.

Small back pack and messenger bag.

The desert is full of extremes.

gorgeous_bluegrey_april_storm_clouds

gorgeous_bluegrey_april_storm_clouds

And within minutes, one can leave the outskirts of the mostly one and two storied homes to reach the wilderness. Biking and hiking are common extracurricular activities around this plain surrounded by mountains.

artful mail boxes

artful mail boxes

the quirky, Skipper riding his bicycle several times across the country who was passing through

Skipper bicycling across country and stopping in Tucson

Skipper bicycling across country and stopping in Tucson

whom I met where I was fixing my bicycle at BICAS

BICAS bicycle inter-community art and salvage

BICAS bicycle inter-community art and salvage

desert palms

Coronado National Forest foothills

And where one’s bicycle can easily deliver them to wilderness.
moon flower desert cliffs

foothills of mountains

about to hike after biking to the trailhead
cactus flower
sunlit saguaro cactus
path to finger rockdesert
waxing moon
flowering moondelicate survival

Yet the culture is far from a desert…beam cloud

another glorious sunset

family walking cat to park

 

stickers_

stickers_1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you look closely, these people are not walking a dog, but their cat. The cat was actually boldly prancing toward a poodle. What? Fantastic!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And its humor.stickers_fab_gun_lawoh woof license plate

Canadian Geese Vocalizing | Fluid in ever-changing formation

Living presently in central Pennsylvania, in the autumn and winter time, one can’t help but notice the flocks of local geese flying by overhead. They tend to fly at dusk, and I presume dawn, but I’m rarely up that early !-)

flock of geese

flock of geese

They are in fact Canadian Geese. http://www.arkive.org/canada-goose/branta-canadensis/

Canada Goose, Wikipedia, Branta Canadensis

Canada Goose Wikipedia Branta Canadensis

flock Canada Geese, duck.org

flock of Canada Geese

They continuously communicate vocally with one another as they’re flying, each one of them calling out simultaneously. They are extremely loud. Here’s a sample of how they sound, no kidding, multiply that by 9! Hundreds fly by daily in large flocks, sometimes as large as 60 or more. You can hear them coming, believe me. At dusk, typically one after another flock flies by – just a few minutes apart from one another. Their formations are ever changing; continuously altering their positions in relationship to one another, gracefully and fluidly adapting in their formation.

The funny thing I’ve noticed a few times now, is the occasional small flock that flies by, in silence. What? How strange! I’ve seen this only a few times and believe I’ve figured out why. Those small groups flying overhead that are astoundingly quiet, are in the periphery of a larger flock nearby – which as always, are exceedingly loud.

geese, northwest

geese on the horizon moving northwest

My theory is that these small separate groups are deliberately remaining silent, in order to clearly hear the adjacent larger flock nearby, which they haven’t yet caught up to.

It’s funny, I imagine them saying to one another, “shhhh, shut up…” so that they can keep their attention focused on the direction of the larger flock; keeping them within their radar.

geese

geese flying above tree in their arrow formation

I like to draw analogies between different animal species and humans. The tactic of the geese is not unlike humans, they want to call out attention to themselves, chatting, talking and listening to any cues. And the most successful way to navigate through any path, is to remain flexible and resilient.

According to wikipedia, the Canada Geese are

extremely successful at living in human-altered areas, Canada geese have proven able to establish breeding colonies in urban and cultivated areas, which provide food and few natural predators, and are well known as a common park species.”

You see them in local farm fields and parks routinely. I see them flying overhead daily, you can hear them coming!

geese, dusk

flock of geese at dusk

pair of Canada Geese, Branta Canadensis

pair of Canada Geese
Branta Canadensis

Penn State University Extension campus describes these local Canadian Geese. http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/wildlife/wildlife-nuisance-and-damage/birds/wildlife-damage-control-6-geese-ducks-and-swans

Excerpted from this link above:

Canada geese mate for life, with both parents caring for, and aggressively protecting, their young. Canada geese in Pennsylvania consist of both migratory and nonmigratory populations. Migratory populations are the Atlantic Population and the Southern James Bay Population. These two populations nest in Canada and migrate south for the winter.

By contrast, the nonmigratory, or resident, population in Pennsylvania has grown from approximately 2,400 from 1955-60 to more than 150,000 in 1993. Adults in this population can begin breeding at age two and have a higher survival rate than migrating birds. The resident population consists of nonmigratory birds that nest and reside in the Mid-Atlantic states, including Pennsylvania, throughout the year.

I notice one of the links mentions them as a nuisance. I think they’re adorable, and enjoy listening to them and watching them! And I laugh to myself when I spot that occasional flock that are ardently silent.

As an avid writer of blogs, who is presently picking up where I left off with my eBook and beginning again to compose music, I ask you rather unambiguously to please donate, if you are able.

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Carol Keiter, blogger

Carol_Keiter_blogger_laughing_2014

carol_keiter_blogger_contemplating_2014

carol_keiter_blogger_contemplating_2014

I contribute writings to each of my blogs, often in the same sitting. Hours later, I’ve finished this one. https://digesthis.wordpress.com/2014/12/13/marijuana-out-of-the-closet-the-cannabis-cure-cbd-tincture/

Obama pledges to combat poaching elephants | If humans are so smart, why do we act so stupidly?

Or shall I say, why do human beings act so irreverently towards the earth and the creatures with whom we share our planet? I’ve written in a former blog about the plight of elephants and rhinoceros due to poaching https://carolkeiter.wordpress.com/2013/02/28/battle-for-the-elephants-documentary-speaks-louder-than-words/

Elephants in Africa

Elephants in Africa

You can read World Wildlife Fund’s article about Obama’s pledge to fight against wildlife crime.
http://worldwildlife.org/stories/obama-pledges-support-to-stop-wildlife-crime-in-africa?utm_source=wildwire&utm_medium=email&utm_content=july2013&utm_campaign=wildlife-trade

I’m honored that Obama has shown his concern and taken action to defend the rights of other species with whom we share this planet. He recognizes the delicate process required to affect change. It’s an integrated system that has to be dismantled. The actual poachers have a quasi militaristic/mafia type organization with sophisticated weapons and transport. Barack Obama as well as Hillary Clinton and others realize that not only does money need to be infused into local economies to combat this problem, but also education. The way to counter this criminal warfare against elephants and other species which inhabit this earth, is to withdraw the incentive; use money and programs to leverage against the poaching operations. Since the indigenous inhabitants of areas of Africa where this poaching exists are lured because of its financial rewards, the people need to be educated about the true worth of these creatures (as opposed to ivory torn from a dead elephant) and enticed with incentives to no longer have interest in poaching. For example, if programs would become available to guide people into ways of conserving water, land, reveal alternative types of farming, growing, building, and display renewable ways of generating energy, etc. and showing the true benefits and appreciation of real ‘live’ elephants (i.e. their uniqueness and intelligence) the people would no longer feel the need or desire to engage in this trade that destroys their treasures. By creating means for local people to help themselves and learn techniques to live more prosperously and harmoniously in their environment, they will be less inclined to ‘sell out’. Certainly part of this investment Obama pledges will also need to go into educating people on the ‘buyers’ end, who want ivory for various reasons. Though the demand for ivory carved for ornamentation or for alleged cures may be ingrained in generations (or over millennia) of people in China and other parts of Asia, the world is a different place now. Our world suffers from over population for one thing. And in this post industrial era, desires of the past need to be reassessed. It is no longer okay to plow through acres of forests, wetlands, to dump toxins into water supplies, or to act in any other careless ways that obviously damage or obliterate pristine environments, just because there may be profit in it for someone. Whereas somehow actions such as these were overlooked or tolerated when the earth seemed to offer an endless supply of abundance of everything, we now know that this is far from the truth.

As our technological advancements have increased our knowledge of the world and extended our reach to every corner of the globe, we have effectively shrunken our world to within reach of a click. Many of the things that we produce to make our lives easier and more convenient have made a dramatically negative impact on our environment. We can no longer blindly pretend that our actions don’t have consequences; drilling for oil, fracking, dredging, coal mining all affect the delicate balance within the ecosystems where these procedures happen. Our production of tools and toys have repercussions affecting everything around us; i.e. superfund sites (designated toxic waste areas) speckle the areas where high tech production of computers and electronic gadgets takes place. Many of these are out of sight, yet can’t be ignored; we can’t discount the consequences that affect air and water quality, environmental health, the dramatic increase in extreme weather (storms, draughts, fires) and the physical and mental health of human beings. We have continued to scourge the earth in the last 60 years. Despite all of our sophisticated high-tech gadgets, the human condition is dramatically out of balance and morally bankrupt. Our emotional and psychological insights haven’t evolved in the same exponentially rapid pace as our technological knowledge. Smart devices have outsmarted human relations. We have machines that talk to us, and yet neighboring countries or rivaling ethnic groups still haven’t mastered the ability to talk through their feuds. Yet what is more savage than warfare against our fellow humans, is the fact that our modern luxuries and expectations coupled with overpopulation and negligence towards other species, means that in the not so distant future, the plethora of creatures who inhabit this earth, of which we are the guardians, will be gone. Massive extinction precipitated by ignorance, greed, short-sidedness and a complete lack of reverence for life. It will no doubt ultimately precipitate the decimation of our own species, by playing too recklessly with the delicate balance of our ecosystem.

Ironically, it is primarily modern ‘civilized’ man of the ‘developed world’ who is responsible for so dramatically destroying the health of our planet and annihilating an alarming number of creatures. There is something glaringly uncivilized about the way in which we have continued on this path of environmental destruction and species irradiation, without having empathy for our fellow man and fellow inhabitants of this planet. As one observes the hierarchy of predators and prey in all species, nature reveals that it is the strong that survive. My question is, if we human beings are so intelligent, with our abstract thinking and rational thought, what has gone so glaringly wrong? Perhaps there’s something very lopsided and obviously missing, when merely measuring the standard IQ, intelligence quotient. We have been fatally disregarding emotional intelligence (EQ) in this equation, and for that matter, an empathetic quotient. It seems to be pretty clear that actions strictly driven by economic motives and consuming, is where we continually go wrong. We need to make more ‘conscious’ assessments about how each of our thoughts and actions affect and ripple throughout our entire environment. Considering that this incredibly beautiful planet with its inextricably interwoven life forms is our only home, to not act responsibly is criminal. If human beings are so ‘gifted’ and the most intelligent species, why have we done more damage to all of life than any other species? What is missing, that we have been so tragically unconscious and acted so unconscionably towards the miraculous ‘gift’ of life? “Don’t destroy what you can’t create.”